With AP Automation is Industry Knowledge Important? 3 Things

It is one of the things I ask when evaluating software… do you know my industry? That’s when the software provider say, “So, what is Accounts Payable Automation anyway?”

Important?

People, generally, believe their Accounts Payable process is unique. If you look at it from a high level, there are only so many ways to open, route, approve and enter invoices into an accounting system. The unique understanding they have tends to come from their internal pain as well as the pain they feel from their vendors. I get those responses a lot where the people evaluating AP Automation say, “There is no way your other clients have the inattention to detail like our users…” or ” Our vendors are so unorganized, there is no way we can automate with them.” Last but not least, “our process has so many twist and turns that I can’t possibly see how Automation would work for us.” With these messages, I can see where someone would gravitate towards a service provider that has knowledge in their industry, but it’s not the most important factor. Consider these three things.

Thing 1 – Problems:

There are some problems in AP that are universal and have to do with the paper and not the company. Problems like, lost invoices, slow process, no visibility to the process, and lack of defined approvals (just to name a few). There are also process problems like spending too much time on certain tasks like filing or data entry as well as skilled employees doing unskilled things like entering consumption information into spreadsheets. My advice when looking for an Accounts Payable Automation service provider is to concentrate on the things I listed first. Find the service provider that solves the problems paper creates… and find the one that does it the best.

Thing 2 – Experience (Period)

If you are looking for experience, industry knowledge should rank belong years. What I mean by that is it is more important (in this day and time) to have more years as an automator than industry knowledge. I wrote “in this day and time” because I wanted to make a point about AP Automation software and service as being early in its development. What I mean by that is AP Automation is still a new idea, and as time goes by there will be more experienced users, leaders and companies. (However) At the moment a company that has 2 years of experience with industry knowledge versus a company with 10 years… the company with 10 years should be more valuable to you than industry knowledge.

Thing 3 – Now!

When it comes down to it and you have two or three evenly matched AP Automation service providers and one has experience in your industry, that’s a plus…. I would recommend choosing that provider.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

The Outcome and Impact of #APAutomation

I tell people who are new to Accounts Payable Automation, whether they are a users, evaluator or salesperson the same thing. I tell them the problem with AP Automation is people don’t know what it is, how it works or the impact that it will have on their organization. Then a pause for a minute and say, “other than that they are fine with automation” and a pause again to see if they laugh.

Need to Define

I have written many times in these articles that I wrote The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation to help define the automation world. I have also written many times that the book didn’t meet that goal, and became more of a best practice book (which is great!).The second book I wrote, The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire was intended to help people develop facts on use to answer the question, “should I (customer) automate AP”. So far that book has also missed it mark (not by much) and has become more of a tool to help define AP Automation (oh boy).

The Definition:

In both books I define Accounts Payable Automation with words… “the independent movement of liabilities through a predefined approval process” (p.18 The 8 Pitfalls). However, what I have found is a definition needed to be more “action” oriented. So my wordy definition changed to, Accounts Payable Automation is only as good as the people time and effort that it frees up.”

What Next?

Once I changed my definition from wordy to action(y), people had the opportunity to quickly understand and (better) were able to transfer that understanding to others within their company. As time has gone by, I have learned another very useful aspect about the action defining; it created a really big question that needed to be answered, and that is if automation is only as people as the people, time and effort that it frees up, then (1) who are those people, (2) what is that time and (3) how much effort?

High Level:

This is really the key to finding out if AP Automation is something that would work for your organization. The book (Argument to Automate) gives you a step by step process on finding people, time and effort, but the important question to ask yourself before you go through the steps is: Do you have any need for more time or to better use your people? If you answer yes to either one of those questions (or better both) then you have at a high level found out that Accounts Payable Automation is something you need.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

There Are 2 Things to Know When Calculating Accounts Payable Cost #APAutomation

One of the first steps in knowing the impact of Accounts Payable Automation is calculating what your Accounts Payable process cost.

Start Here

What is your current cost per invoice is one of the first questions I ask someone when starting or wanting to improve their AP Automation journey.

2 Things

1. Hard Dollar – This is cost that is associated to tasks that, when automated are eliminated 100%. Look at the chart below. The steps in the Accounts Payable process that are slashed are previously people, time and effort that the organization doesn’t have to do… software will take over the task… creepy huh?

2014_01_03_11_19_06_20

2. Soft Dollar. Well if hard dollar are costs associated to those process steps that are completely eliminated then soft dollar are those costs that impacted by Accounts Payable Automation, but not completely eliminated. (Again) Using the graphic above you can see the coding and approving of invoices are example of soft dollar cost. When automated, the ideas is automation can help (greatly if done right) coding and approving, but the tasks are still part of the process. They are business decisions that still have to be made, so they are not eliminated 100%.

Be Warned

I was thinking to write a title to this section more dramatic than “be warned”… but maturity has gotten the best of me (dang), so on with the warning.

If you base decisions (change, ROI, Cost Per Invoice…) on soft dollar cost you have put yourself in a position to not achieve your goal. Soft dollar is a moving target that cannot be accurately pinned down. I guess I can write that soft dollar is like shifting sand… and you know what happens when you build a house on that stuff.

More?

Now don’t get me wrong. There is nothing wrong with soft dollar savings, it’s just not good when setting and achieving numbers based goals. Hard dollar on the other hand is a much better benchmark because the tasks are there and when automated they are gone. If the task of entering invoices into the accounting system cost your organization $4.50 per invoice, then you can expect to have a cost reduction of $4.50 per invoice. Now… here is the best news. At the end of the process you find that you only saved $3 and not the $4.50… you have more work to do. That’s probably the biggest benefit of using hard dollar cost.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people that startedAvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information.

4 Things that will help you know if your current process is ready for #APAutomation

I consider myself a person that does a lot of preparing. To give you an example my family and I moved about 8 months ago and I had a detailed project plan with an attached Spreadsheet that nobody but me paid attention to. In the end we moved but I think the rest of the family would have been better off if we would have fallen the plan.

The Key

I think the key to good planning is preparation. The better prepared you are the better the plan. Being prepared is one of the reasons I wrote The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation. Generally an automation journey starts with an internet search. The search present 3 or 4 service providers with great websites, which starts you on a path that leads to demos, analysis, more demos, and no clear decision. In The 8 Pitfalls I recommend that you do some internal soul search before you every pick up a clicker and start an internet search.

4 Things

Thing 1 to help you know that your current process is ready for AP Automation is to ask yourself and team, and then ultimately analyze the last time your Accounts Payable process was updated. It is a very good practice whether you automate or not to review your process to make sure it is current. If you answer this questions between 3 years and never then you aren’t ready to automate.

Thing 2 to help you know that your current process is ready for AP Automation is to create a process map of all invoice activities. Some of you are lucky (you probably didn’t think about that when you were putting it together) you were mandated to map the process. Larger or public companies are required to create written approval rules… that’s a process map. For those of you that don’t have this mandated, you will need to write down each step of each process to have a full view of where invoices are going, who is approving and what the exception process is during the approval process.

Thing 3 to help you know that your current process is ready for AP Automation is to establish a cost for the process. Regardless of how many invoices and the dollar amount on those invoices. your process cost your organization a certain amount of money. Traditionally I refer to this as cost per invoice (CPI). One of the key indicators that proves the impact of automation is cost reduction. If you don’t know your current cost you won’t know if it can be reduced.

Thing 4 to help you know that your current process is ready for AP Automation is after you have done your research, cost and map to take a very critical look at every process and ask each step what its purpose. I have a belief that is walk a step in a process back to it origin you will find out why it was created and who it servers. If that purpose doesn’t match with what you need to accomplish then you have to put a big red “X” on that step.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people that startedAvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information.

With AP Automation, Is Cost The Most Important Factor? – 1 Sad Story.

I think I would turn off an entire group of readers if I wrote that cost wasn’t important. Cost is the way we establish value for things. Cost helps up benchmark and prioritize projects within the business world. Cost is very important, but today I am going to use a real life example to help answer the question, is cost the most important thing?

Once upon a time…

I was working with a smaller size company a few years ago. When the sales representative initially engaged me to help explain AP Automation, I was very happy to find on the other line of the phone a company that was very serious about automation. As you can imagine, the majority of conversations I have are with people who are sorting out if Accounts Payable Automation is right for them or not. Don’t get me wrong, I like those conversations too, but it’s just nice to interact with someone who knows the value, or who I thought knew the value (insert duh-duh-duh music here). A few minutes into the conversation, the prospective client halted the product and service discovery and jump directly to price negotiation. I bowed out and let the rep take over. Then the prospective client started explaining, almost bragging, how they always get a discount in every deal they do. They took pride is getting the best price… better than anyone. I could tell the sales rep will settling in for a continuous ride. After weeks, almost six weeks of pricing negotiations, the client and company agreed to financial terms. The client was happy and the sales rep was battered and bruised.

The rest of the story…

(I loved Paul Harvey) I followed up with the rep on this client to see how the implementation was going, and the rep told me something that, well, shocked me. He said that the implementation had stalled, which is something that never happens with this company and the client was trying to get out of the agreement. Turns out that once the client got into implementation they had no idea what they had purchased (at a good rate) and they had no real goals on what success looked like. Although the rep didn’t, I blamed myself a lot of that. Looking back I should not have let the company go into pricing negotiation so quickly without understanding the values or at least having some back of the envelope goals to guide them. It was a disaster all they way around.

Lessons?

The rep was trained that when a prospective clients wants to buy… sell it to them. That’s pretty easy to understand, and quite natural. However, as a consumer you have to protect yourself and not only know what you are buying but know the impact that it will have on your organization. Buyer beware is something I was taught at a very early age, and it’s still good advice. So is cost the most important thing… no, the offering and the impact is… then cost.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

The Outcome and Impact of #APAutomation

I tell people who are new to Accounts Payable Automation, whether they are a users, evaluator or salesperson the same thing. I tell them the problem with AP Automation is people don’t know what it is, how it works or the impact that it will have on their organization. Then a pause for a minute and say, “other than that they are fine with automation” and a pause again to see if they laugh.

Need to Define

I have written many times in these articles that I wrote The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation to help define the automation world. I have also written many times that the book didn’t meet that goal, and became more of a best practice book (which is great!).The second book I wrote, The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire was intended to help people develop facts on use to answer the question, “should I (customer) automate AP”. So far that book has also missed it mark (not by much) and has become more of a tool to help define AP Automation (oh boy).

The Definition:

In both books I define Accounts Payable Automation with words… “the independent movement of liabilities through a predefined approval process” (p.18 The 8 Pitfalls). However, what I have found is a definition needed to be more “action” oriented. So my wordy definition changed to, Accounts Payable Automation is only as good as the people time and effort that it frees up.”

What Next?

Once I changed my definition from wordy to action(y), people had the opportunity to quickly understand and (better) were able to transfer that understanding to others within their company. As time has gone by, I have learned another very useful aspect about the action defining; it created a really big question that needed to be answered, and that is if automation is only as people as the people, time and effort that it frees up, then (1) who are those people, (2) what is that time and (3) how much effort?

High Level:

This is really the key to finding out if AP Automation is something that would work for your organization. The book (Argument to Automate) gives you a step by step process on finding people, time and effort, but the important question to ask yourself before you go through the steps is: Do you have any need for more time or to better use your people? If you answer yes to either one of those questions (or better both) then you have at a high level found out that Accounts Payable Automation is something you need.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

The 12 Days of Accounts Payable Automated Christmas

On the first day of automation my service provider gave to me a paperless process in my office

On the second day of automation my service provider gave to me, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the third day of automation my service provider gave to me; three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the fourth day of automation my service provider gave to me; four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the fifth day of automation my service provider gave to me: FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the sixth day of automation my service provider gave to me: Six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the seventh day of automation my service provider gave to me: seven OCR errors, Six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the eighth day of automation my service provider gave to me: eight process maps, seven OCR errors, six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the ninth day of automation my service provider gave to me: nine project plans, eight process maps, seven OCR errors, six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the tenth day of automation my service provider gave to me: ten user trainings, nine project plans, eight process maps, seven OCR errors, six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the eleventh day of automation my service provider gave to me; eleven faster approvals, ten user trainings, nine project plans, eight process maps, seven OCR errors, six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

On the twelfth day of automation my service provider gave to me: twelve change management issues, eleven faster approvals, ten user trainings, nine project plans, eight process maps, seven OCR errors, six figure ROI, FIVE VENDOR COMPLAINTS: four admin logins, three workflows, two progress reports and a paperless process in my office

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

With Workflow Should I Eliminate Steps? #APAutomation

When I think of eliminating steps I always think of George Costanza and the step skipper. Enjoy:

There Is A Thought

When Automating Accounts Payable there is a thought that you need to create as few approval processes (workflows) and steps as possible. This is a good idea because it comes from the notion that automation should be efficient as possible. It’s a good thought, and trying to become as efficient as possible is a great because after all one of the great benefits of automation is efficiency.

Efficiency and Order

When looking at eliminating steps in an approval process, efficiency shouldn’t be the first consideration. The first consideration should be who needs to approve the invoice. I put an emphasis on “approve”. I really hate to write this, but the point behind an approval process is to approve invoices. The word approve, however, is where people struggle. When you automate your AP process before you ever choose a service provider you need to have a very good definition of “approve”. The one I coach people on is that approvals are only those actions that holds some sort of purpose in the invoice getting into the accounting system for payment. Some of these actions are:

      • Sign off that the work has been done
      • The goods have been delivered
      • Check against budget
      • PO match if not automated
      • Conditional situations (job cost, capitalized expenses…)
      • Coding assignment or validation

Paper Dysfunction

You may think that I have just given you some obvious advice, but when automating AP you need to take out those things that are associated to “Paper Dysfunction”. Paper dysfunction are those steps that are created because of paper. Paper unlike automation needs additional steps for controls, checks and balances. Other steps that are somewhat dysfunctional are people inserting themselves in the process to either get or see certain information on the invoice. I would see this a lot with utility invoices that needed consumption data analyzed.

Good News

With Accounts Payable Automation, your software will be your controls, checks and balances, that’s one of the great benefits of automation. Also, the person who needs to see or gather the information, can get a report of that information or the invoice, therefore there is no need for them to be in the approval process. The rule should be, only approves are in the approval process, everyone else is accommodated by a report.

Skipping Steps?

Don’t be a step skipper like George said, but eliminate the steps that are needed for paper because you don’t need them for automation.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

Headcount Reduction and Accounting Automation – #apautomation #fintech

I was recently reminded by a friend in the industry that most of the work that I do appeals to the middle market. I am not ashamed of helping middle market companies automate. I know it’s sexy to have big name logos on your website, but the middle market is where all the opportunities is. The reason for this small rant is to set the proper stage for a headcount reduction article.

The Combo Role

As I go through my business day, I interact with anywhere from 5 to 20 different organizations and their automation needs. What I have found are the larger companies (my definition of large is 30k invoices a month or more) have a greater desire to use headcount reduction as the main motivator, whereas middle to small companies won’t. The reason has to do with what I call the “combo” role. The combo role is where an accountant serves in different areas of the accounting department, Meaning they may do some AP, or AR and may help close the books for the quarter and provide the board with financial reports. That’s a combo role. In larger companies those task are more specialized because of volume.

My Point

Here is my point (you are welcome) – headcount reduction greatly benefits the larger company because of specialization. I worked with an organization in Atlanta that employed 42 accounts payable entry clerks. The return on investment was simple – Average AP Entry Clerk salary X 39 (because they had to keep a few people for emergency checks and other projects) = ROI. In contrast, working with a company that had 1000 invoices per month was going to free up ½ of an AP Entry Clerk (I will remain grown up here and not make a joke about which ½).

Really – Now My Point

Here is my real point (you are welcome again) – there is a myth that automation is only good for and can only be justified if someone losses their job. NOT TRUE. Take a look at the two companies in the previous paragraph; the large company with the big ROI has done nothing… they are having trouble getting out of their own way to make a decision on automation. The 1000 invoice per month company once automated took that over 1000 additional hours and applied it to contract and vendor discount administration and is happily without paper invoices.  The moral of the story is anyone can get a return on investment for automation; you just have to know what to do and where to look.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

The Outcome and Impact of #APAutomation

I tell people who are new to Accounts Payable Automation, whether they are a users, evaluator or salesperson the same thing. I tell them the problem with AP Automation is people don’t know what it is, how it works or the impact that it will have on their organization. Then a pause for a minute and say, “other than that they are fine with automation” and a pause again to see if they laugh.

Need to Define

I have written many times in these articles that I wrote The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation to help define the automation world. I have also written many times that the book didn’t meet that goal, and became more of a best practice book (which is great!).The second book I wrote, The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire was intended to help people develop facts on use to answer the question, “should I (customer) automate AP”. So far that book has also missed it mark (not by much) and has become more of a tool to help define AP Automation (oh boy).

The Definition:

In both books I define Accounts Payable Automation with words… “the independent movement of liabilities through a predefined approval process” (p.18 The 8 Pitfalls). However, what I have found is a definition needed to be more “action” oriented. So my wordy definition changed to, Accounts Payable Automation is only as good as the people time and effort that it frees up.”

What Next?

Once I changed my definition from wordy to action(y), people had the opportunity to quickly understand and (better) were able to transfer that understanding to others within their company. As time has gone by, I have learned another very useful aspect about the action defining; it created a really big question that needed to be answered, and that is if automation is only as people as the people, time and effort that it frees up, then (1) who are those people, (2) what is that time and (3) how much effort?

High Level:

This is really the key to finding out if AP Automation is something that would work for your organization. The book (Argument to Automate) gives you a step by step process on finding people, time and effort, but the important question to ask yourself before you go through the steps is: Do you have any need for more time or to better use your people? If you answer yes to either one of those questions (or better both) then you have at a high level found out that Accounts Payable Automation is something you need.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information