Why Salespeople Don’t Listen – #sales #salestraining

I can’t tell you how many times I have said that an article, book, seminar, webinar, or conversation… needs drama. I typically get a laugh which isn’t what I am really going for. When I announce something is about ready to get dramatic, it’s a warning. Be warned that this article has what on the surface is drama but when you get to the end, I hope you will agree that the idea is only dramatic in its counter corporate approach.

Salespeople

I am always shocked when a rep doesn’t take my advice. I have thought a lot about this. Even looking at traditional sales training and the rate of success or really the lack of success of a rep adopting the information. It seems that the only person, in sales training, that thinks the information was absorbed was the trainer. What I have concluded is the person is the key (stay with me).

Of Course

As a coach or teacher, it’s very easy for me to disconnect myself from the success of the rep by just saying that it’s up to them to take what I am teaching and incorporate it. That’s too much of an excuse to be lazy in teaching. However, it is really up to the rep to incorporate what I am teaching, but what I have found that makes the information stick and is pure magic is…. Time

Time?

In a little bit of an accidental experiment (because I would never willingly experiment on real humans and their success) I coached a rep, which at the time the company said that this person would never be more than a cold caller, from his first deal to revenue productive to revenue consistent. Now he is running a sales division with several reps reporting to him. It isn’t the reporting part that is so important it’s what I taught him – he is able to turn the information around and teach others and they are having success. Then there is another rep that engaged me to help. We had an initial conversation and he was pretty excited about the possibilities. In an attempt to speed up his success I gave him all of the critical information that I learned in a short window… to which he did nothing with it. The first person I spent years in the deal trenches and the second person-hours, but I gave them the same information.

So?

It’s not that the second person wasn’t listening… although from a traditional sales training approach that would be the conclusion. It was the first person had time to make it his own even though I was giving him the same advice. The first person was able to own the information to the point where the company gives him credit. The second person was never able to own the information and make it theirs so they did what was natural which is revert to unsuccessful habits. The downside is the old habits of the second person are unfortunately not working. People in order, to sell innovation, have to sell differently. Solution selling, which was popularized thirty years ago doesn’t work with innovation…

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

Where Does Risk Come Into #Entrepreneurship – #Success #Fintech

 

When I was in college I thought I was sooooooo smart. I had a very little picture of a bottle Wisk detergent in my dorm room and I would tell who asked that, “every once in a while you have to take a little Wisk” and I would hand it to them. I know you are laughing on the inside.

Shocking

In conducting my UNCC class on Entrepreneurship I introduced the idea of risk in starting a business. Now, keep in mind my students are some variety of computer sciences major, and my class (for the most part) is and has been the only “business type” class they have ever taken. Their views of entrepreneurship is the typical view that we are a bunch of “work hard – play hard – fly by the seat of your pants – 5 hour energy drinking – sport car driving – can’t get a word in edge wise” risk takers. I think we all know the stereotype, however, it cannot be future from the truth. When I told my class that information was met with a great amount of skepticism.

Skepticism

The idea that I introduced to my class was entrepreneurs are not risk takers. Well, good entrepreneurs are not risk takers. Taking risk is a skill, and like any skill can be matured, practiced and perfected. An example, and as I continue on my journey to close the gap between salespeople and entrepreneurs (to me they are the same) an entrepreneur that is focused on generating income for the company knows that it is less a focus on income and more a focus on activity that will bring in that income. Activity like making calls, meeting people, webinars, conferences, blogging, advertisement, articles, social media, website traffic… With higher levels of activity and the more consistent that activity is the less risky the plight of generating income.

Luck?

I can’t tell you how many people don’t understand this and are subject to things like timing and the winds of change. Entrepreneurs that have a focus on mitigating risk by skill building are consistently labeled as lucky. Well, they are and I count myself as one of these because of what a mentor of mine told me about the topic of luck. He said luck is when opportunity meets preparedness. With a definition like that the more you prepare and the more you put yourself out there using activity the luckier you will be.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people that startedAvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact usfor more information.

What’s the deal with Success? #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #fintech #success

In my head, when I wrote this title I think I was channeling my inter Jerry Seinfeld. I really miss his show and watch the reruns whenever I can. However, my kids don’t really seem to get it.

I had always wanted to teach a class on success. I consider myself successful – others tell me that I am successful, but I think for the point of this article it’s important that you know that I believe that I am not there yet. I think there is a lot more for me to do and achieve. At 47 (that’s right – I am telling my age) I believe that I am just getting started. Because of teaching at UNC – Charlotte and running an internal mentoring program at AvidXchange (with both employee and interns) I have found out a few things about success that I wanted to pass on to the rest of the world.

The Problem

Have you ever notice that solving other people’s problems are easy than solving your problems? That’s because they are your problems and the bigger the problem the less ability you have to be creative and think outside the box. However, problems and obstacles are the root and basis of all success. People have a tendency view successful people as being lucky or folks that were given something that you don’t have access to. It’s not true. Take as an example famous people who are famous for no reason (I won’t name their names because I physically can’t bring myself to type them). Just because someone is on TV and have what seems to be a lot of money. That doesn’t mean they are successful. As I painfully watch reality TV because my wife loves it and I love her, the more and more I think about it the more I realize there is no one on any of those shows that are successful. Money and fame can be a detractor to success.

Real Success

The more I study the more I come to realize that success is not passing people by or eluding people, it just that they don’t know what it is. When you don’t know what something is (like success) then there is no way to know if you have it or not. That’s why I have made a persistent and conscious effort to teach people who in order to be successful you must have two things:

  1. A Definition – Tricky thing about success is you can’t touch it or grab it so the definition you come up with can’t be touched or grabbed either. (Like a car, house or title – that’s not success) Material things are outcomes of successes but not success. If you are interested, I will share my definition of success but you will have to contact me because I don’t really want to publish it.
  2. A Plan – Without a path, road or direction – any road will take you were you are going. I know I didn’t get the quote right but without details you are left to whims, changing winds and worst of all pointless and meaningless daily activities which is what creates depression and the idea that your life, business or direction is meaningless. The opposite of this is when you have a plan you have hope and you have motivation and when you hit on difficult times you keep working the plan and fighting.

Final Thoughts

Don’t sign up to be a victim. Having a proactive and intentional life is exciting and fulfilling. It’s never too late to start and great news – starting is easy. First define and then plan.

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

2 Things That Kills Entrepreneurship #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship

 

Now that I have experience and teaching entrepreneurship at UNCC has given me a unique view of success and failure. I had a mentor tell me years ago that you can learn more from failure than you can from success. I really didn’t know what he was talking about at the time but I sure do now.

Failure

For some reason (probably the pain) failure tends to stick with me more. I don’t like thinking about my failures but as I fail and succeed the more negative is a better teacher.  In the pursuit of better teaching, I have added a module to my class on why entrepreneurs fail. I don’t really like to teach on it but the students seem to really take to the information, and I have found two things that seem to be consistent to lack of business startup success.

Thing 1

Entrepreneurs are a very funny breed. You need to have a strong stomach, thick skin and a lazer focus. All of that equates to what the rest of the world calls stubbornness. If you are an entrepreneur or you know one you know that you can barely talk them out of anything. When we first started AvidXchange in 2000 it was five heard strong – wanting to do it my way – men. You can imagine the arguments we had. It’s difficult to change an entrepreneur’s mind when they get stuck on some idea and they are convinced that their idea is going to be the next big thing. (However) That is the first failure, which is the inability to change. When an entrepreneur is so wedded to their idea that they won’t change or aren’t creative enough to change it’s only a matter of time before the business begins to suffer. I am sure there are exceptions to this, but in the innovative tech world (that I live in) change is key to success. It is, however, interesting that you can change too much, so there has to be a balancing act between changing and staying focused. It is important to mention that cycles have a tendency to operate in 18 month groups. I can’t remember where I got this from, but it’s been years since I was introduced to this idea and I have used it successfully to keep the balance between change and changing too much.

Thing 2

The next thing that will kill entrepreneurs is selling. All successful entrepreneurs are great salespeople. The problem is that so many people have such a negative view of selling that they either won’t give it a chance (because it’s a learned skill) or are unable to recognize good selling. When good selling in done well by a pro the person being sold to will have no idea and they will think the person is being honest or displaying a lot of integrity. With this failure there is the obvious… if the entrepreneur can’t or (this is what happens most of the time) won’t sell then the company won’t make any money which is a quick road to failure. Consider this too, that as an entrepreneur selling to customers is important but selling to advisors, bankers, investors, board members, employees and family (especially family) is just as important.

Think of This

Not being able or unwilling to sell and not changing put a person in a position to where all of their eggs are on the sides of the road (not even in a basket) and both selling and being able to evaluate opportunity are skills that can learned and taught and improved.

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and Queen’s University as well as  travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

Why Salespeople Don’t Listen – #sales #salestraining

I can’t tell you how many times I have said that an article, book, seminar, webinar, or conversation… needs drama. I typically get a laugh which isn’t what I am really going for. When I announce something is about ready to get dramatic, it’s a warning. Be warned that this article has what on the surface is drama but when you get to the end, I hope you will agree that the idea is only dramatic in its counter corporate approach.

Salespeople

I am always shocked when a rep doesn’t take my advice. I have thought a lot about this. Even looking at traditional sales training and the rate of success or really the lack of success of a rep adopting the information. It seems that the only person, in sales training, that thinks the information was absorbed was the trainer. What I have concluded is the person is the key (stay with me).

Of Course

As a coach or teacher, it’s very easy for me to disconnect myself from the success of the rep by just saying that it’s up to them to take what I am teaching and incorporate it. That’s too much of an excuse to be lazy in teaching. However, it is really up to the rep to incorporate what I am teaching, but what I have found that makes the information stick and is pure magic is…. Time

Time?

In a little bit of an accidental experiment (because I would never willingly experiment on real humans and their success) I coached a rep, which at the time the company said that this person would never be more than a cold caller, from his first deal to revenue productive to revenue consistent. Now he is running a sales division with several reps reporting to him. It isn’t the reporting part that is so important it’s what I taught him – he is able to turn the information around and teach others and they are having success. Then there is another rep that engaged me to help. We had an initial conversation and he was pretty excited about the possibilities. In an attempt to speed up his success I gave him all of the critical information that I learned in a short window… to which he did nothing with it. The first person I spent years in the deal trenches and the second person-hours, but I gave them the same information.

So?

It’s not that the second person wasn’t listening… although from a traditional sales training approach that would be the conclusion. It was the first person had time to make it his own even though I was giving him the same advice. The first person was able to own the information to the point where the company gives him credit. The second person was never able to own the information and make it theirs so they did what was natural which is revert to unsuccessful habits. The downside is the old habits of the second person are unfortunately not working. People in order, to sell innovation, have to sell differently. Solution selling, which was popularized thirty years ago doesn’t work with innovation…

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

What’s the deal with Success? #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #fintech #success

I had always wanted to teach a class on success. I consider myself successful – others tell me that I am successful, but I think for the point of this article it’s important that you know that I believe it’s not over for me. I think there is a lot more for me to do and achieve. At 48 (that’s right – I am telling my age) I believe that I am just getting started. Because of teaching at UNC – Charlotte and Queens University  and running an internal mentoring program at AvidXchange (with both employee and interns) I have found out a few things about success that I wanted to pass on to pass along.

The Problem

Have you ever notice that solving other people’s problems are easier than solving your problems? That’s because it’s difficult with your problems to have objectivity. (And) The bigger the problem the less ability you have to be creative and think outside the box. However, problems and obstacles are the root and basis of all success. People have a tendency t0 judge successful people as being lucky or folks that were given something unique. It’s not true. Take as an example famous people who are famous for no reason (I won’t name their names because I physically can’t bring myself to type them). Just because someone is on TV and has what seems to be a lot of money, that doesn’t mean they are successful. As I painfully watch reality TV, because my wife loves it and I love her, the more I think about it the more I realize there is no one on any of those shows that are successful. Money and fame can be a detractor to success.

Real Success

The more I study the more I come to realize that success is not passing people by or eluding people, it just that they don’t know what it is. When you don’t know what something is (like success) there is no way to know if you have it or not. There are two things you need to be successful:

  1. A Definition – Tricky thing about success is you can’t touch it or grab it, so the definition you come up with can’t be touched or grabbed either. (Like a car, house or title – that’s not success) Material things are outcomes of successes but not success. If you are interested, I will share my definition of success but you will have to contact me because I don’t really want to publish it.
  2. A Plan – Without a path, road or direction – any road will take you were you are going. I know I didn’t get the quote right but without details you are left to whims, changing winds and worst – pointless and meaningless daily activities which is what creates depression and the idea that your life is meaningless. The opposite of this is when you have a plan you have hope and you have motivation and when you hit on difficult times you keep working the plan and fighting.

Final Thoughts

Don’t sign up to be a victim. Having a proactive and intentional life is exciting and fulfilling. It’s never too late to start and great news – starting is easy. First define and then plan.

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

Where Does Risk Come Into #Entrepreneurship – #Success #Fintech

 

When I was in college I thought I was sooooooo smart. I had a very little picture of a bottle Wisk detergent in my dorm room and I would tell anyone who asked  “every once in a while you have to take a little Wisk” and I would hand it to them. I know you are laughing on the inside.

Shocking

In conducting my UNCC class on Entrepreneurship I introduced the idea of risk in starting a business. Now, keep in mind my students are some variety of computer sciences major, and my class (for the most part) is and has been the only “business type” class they have ever taken. Their views of entrepreneurship is a typical view that we (entrepreneurs)  are a bunch of “work hard – play hard – fly by the seat of your pants – 5 hour energy drinking – sport car driving – can’t get a word in edge wise” risk takers. I think we all know the stereotype, however, it cannot be future from the truth. When I told my class that information was met with a great amount of skepticism.

Skepticism

The idea that I introduced to my class was entrepreneurs are not risk takers. Well, good entrepreneurs are not risk takers. Taking risk is a skill, and like any skill, it can be nurtured, practiced and perfected. An example, and as I continue on my journey to close the gap between salespeople and entrepreneurs (to me they are the same) an entrepreneur that is focused on generating income for the company knows that it is less a focus on income and more a focus on activity that will bring in that income. Activity like making calls, meeting people, webinars, conferences, blogging, advertisement, articles, social media, website traffic… With higher levels of activity and the more consistent that activity is the less risky the plight of generating income.

Luck?

I can’t tell you how many people don’t understand that luck isn’t subject to things like timing and the winds of change. Entrepreneurs that have a focus on mitigating risk by skill building are consistently labeled as lucky. Well, they are and I count myself as one of these because of what a mentor of mine told me about the topic of luck. He said luck is when opportunity meets preparedness. With a definition like that the more you prepare and the more you put yourself out there using activity the luckier you will be.

 

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at Queens University and  UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people that startedAvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact usfor more information.

2 Things That Kills Entrepreneurship #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship

 

Teaching entrepreneurship at UNCC has given me a unique view of success and failure. Years ago, a mentor told me that you learn more from failure than you do from success. I really didn’t know what he was talking about at the time, but I do now.

Failure

For some reason (probably the pain), failure tends to stick with me more. In the pursuit of better teaching, I have added a module to my class on why entrepreneurs fail. I don’t really like to teach on it, but the students seem to take to the information, and I have found two things that seem to be consistent in a lack of business startup success.

Thing 1

Entrepreneurs are a very funny breed. You need to have a strong stomach, thick skin and a laser focus. All of this equals what the rest of the world calls stubbornness. When we first started AvidXchange in 2000, it was five head strong – I do it my way – men. You can imagine the arguments we had. It’s difficult to change an entrepreneur’s mind when they get stuck on some idea and they are convinced that their idea is going to be the next big thing. (However) That is the first failure, the inability to change. When an entrepreneur is so wedded to an idea, refusing to change it, or not creative enough to, it’s only a matter of time before the business begins to suffer. I am sure there are exceptions to this, but in the innovative tech world (that I live in) change is key to success. It is, however, possible that you can change too much.  There has to be some balancing act between changing and staying focused. It is important to mention that cycles have a tendency to operate in 18 month time periods. I do not remember where I heard this, but it’s been years since I was first introduced to this idea and I have used it successfully to maintain balance between change and too much change.

Thing 2

The next thing that will inhibit the entrepreneur is selling. All successful entrepreneurs are great salespeople. The problem is that so many people have such a negative view of selling that they either won’t give it a chance (because it’s a learned skill), or are unable to recognize good selling. When selling is done by a pro, the person being sold to will have no idea they are being sold to.  They will believe the salesperson is being honest, and displaying a lot of integrity. This failure is the obvious… if the entrepreneur can’t, or (this is what happens most of the time) won’t sell, then the company will not make any money – a quick road to failure. Consider too, as an entrepreneur, selling to customers is important but selling to advisors, bankers, investors, board members, employees and family (especially family) is just as important.

Think of This

Not being able or willing to sell, and unwillingness to change put a person in the position of having all their eggs on the sides of the road (not even in a basket).  Both selling and being able to evaluate opportunities are skills that can be learned, taught and improved.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

What’s the deal with Success? #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #fintech #success

In my head, when I wrote this title I think I was channeling my inter Jerry Seinfeld. I really miss his show and watch the reruns whenever I can. However, my kids don’t really seem to get it.

I had always wanted to teach a class on success. I consider myself successful – others tell me that I am successful, but I think for the point of this article it’s important that you know that I believe that I am not there yet. I think there is a lot more for me to do and achieve. At 47 (that’s right – I am telling my age) I believe that I am just getting started. Because of teaching at UNC – Charlotte and running an internal mentoring program at AvidXchange (with both employee and interns) I have found out a few things about success that I wanted to pass on to the rest of the world.

The Problem

Have you ever notice that solving other people’s problems are easy than solving your problems? That’s because they are your problems and the bigger the problem the less ability you have to be creative and think outside the box. However, problems and obstacles are the root and basis of all success. People have a tendency view successful people as being lucky or folks that were given something that you don’t have access to. It’s not true. Take as an example famous people who are famous for no reason (I won’t name their names because I physically can’t bring myself to type them). Just because someone is on TV and have what seems to be a lot of money. That doesn’t mean they are successful. As I painfully watch reality TV because my wife loves it and I love her, the more and more I think about it the more I realize there is no one on any of those shows that are successful. Money and fame can be a detractor to success.

Real Success

The more I study the more I come to realize that success is not passing people by or eluding people, it just that they don’t know what it is. When you don’t know what something is (like success) then there is no way to know if you have it or not. That’s why I have made a persistent and conscious effort to teach people who in order to be successful you must have two things:

  1. A Definition – Tricky thing about success is you can’t touch it or grab it so the definition you come up with can’t be touched or grabbed either. (Like a car, house or title – that’s not success) Material things are outcomes of successes but not success. If you are interested, I will share my definition of success but you will have to contact me because I don’t really want to publish it.
  2. A Plan – Without a path, road or direction – any road will take you were you are going. I know I didn’t get the quote right but without details you are left to whims, changing winds and worst of all pointless and meaningless daily activities which is what creates depression and the idea that your life, business or direction is meaningless. The opposite of this is when you have a plan you have hope and you have motivation and when you hit on difficult times you keep working the plan and fighting.

Final Thoughts

Don’t sign up to be a victim. Having a proactive and intentional life is exciting and fulfilling. It’s never too late to start and great news – starting is easy. First define and then plan.

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people who started AvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact us for more information

Selling and Fear! #selling #sales #entrepreneurship #fintech

I had a mentor that would say that “fear” stood for False – Evidence – Appearing – Real. FDR’s famous quote… “The only thing we have to fear…” well you know the rest of it. As a salesperson and entrepreneur for years I have had a very predictable view of fear in the selling until recently and now, I don’t know what to think.

Traditional

Weather it was something I learned or just made it up (now I can’t remember if I made it up or not) but my traditional view of “fear” and selling is to create it. People tell me that I am really good at doing this with prospective client, and I must admit it is a thing I do but it take the proper set up and relationship for the fear planting to work. Now, don’t get me wrong, I don’t put the customer in such a panic that they have to do business with me… I use the fear to have the customer motivate to action and motivate others in the business to action.

What Happened?

Last week, I can’t remember where I head this, but I was listening to a podcast where it explained that sales professional were thinking about fear all wrong. Now, keep in mind that I am not one to change my direction for a trend or snappy new way. Funny thing is I help companies change all of the time but I am uncomfortable with change. However, this time the right message must have hit me at the right time. The message was – sales people shouldn’t create fear they have to stop fear.

What?

It really started me thinking about all of times I created fear to help motivate the deal when in actuality I needed to solve for fear and eliminate fear. This sent me on a quick journey of my fear producing statement and my actions that created fear and I have concluded with this… If I motivate by using fear the least path of resistance is for my customer to comply, but if I reduce the fear of them doing business with me, their desire to work with me becomes greater.

Want to know more? Buy My Books!

To buy the book – The Argument to Automate – How Innovation Can INSPIRE Not Fire – click here to buy

(Also) To get your copy of The 8 Pitfalls of Accounts Payable Automation – click here to buy

How about a children’s book? The Princess and the Paper – click here to buy

About The Author:

Christopher Elmore has written 8 books, countless articles, lectures at UNC – Charlotte and travels around the country speaking on on the topics of startup success, sales, presentation skills, change, entrepreneurship, accounts payable and payment automation. Having deep startup and entrepreneurial experience, Christopher was one of the six people that startedAvidXchange in 2000 and continues to work in the business today. If you hire Christopher to speak or teach at your company or event… you won’t be sorry! Request a media kit or contact usfor more information.